Reflection on Jad Abumrad’s Radio Empathy

I LOVED this interview, short and sweet, but directly to the point of something that I think is so important. I never wondered much about radio and the techniques behind selling/marketing radio stories and audio pieces. However, Abumrad brings to light an important point that the compelling aspects of radio lie solely in the human voice. I’m and English major, and I fully understand what it’s like to have words and sentences before you, yet no picture from the author. I never thought of radio in this way, but it could not be more true. As Abumrad states, there is no visual aspect to radio. Instead, words spoke by the newscaster or whoever it may be, are left to be visually created and imagined by the audience. This is so powerful. Both author and audience/listener have the authority to paint whatever picture in their minds, creating this deep and intimate connection between the two groups of people. This is such a powerful aspect of literature, and I think it’s important to note and take to heart that this is also an important element to audio production. This all definitely gives me a new perspective on creating/producing/sharing audio stories.

4 thoughts on “Reflection on Jad Abumrad’s Radio Empathy

  1. Miles Davis

    I agree with all your comments. Radio is unique because it allows for freedom for people to create their own images to connect to the words. I agree with you about the human voice as a powerful stimulate. Audio stories allow people to create their own perspective of what is being described. The beautiful thing of this is that one person can perceive it as something and another person can perceive as the complete opposite. Neither perspective is wrong, its just an individual’s imagination. The media and technology are so robotic, meaning that it can only mean one thing. For example anything visual does not allow for the freedom of imagination. However radio does not use visuals so it allows for imagination. I too hope radio never dies because if it dies then so does human imagination and creativity.

    Reply
  2. Miles Davis

    I agree with all your comments. Radio is unique because it allows for freedom for people to create their own images to connect to the words. I agree with you about the human voice as a powerful stimulate. Audio stories allow people to create their own perspective of what is being described. The beautiful thing of this is that one person can perceive it as something and another person can perceive as the complete opposite. Neither perspective is wrong, its just an individual’s imagination. The media and technology are so robotic, meaning that it can only mean one thing. For example anything visual does not allow for the freedom of imagination. However radio does not use visuals so it allows for imagination. I too hope radio never dies because if it dies then so does human imagination and creativity. #talkingpolack106

    Reply
  3. Stephanie

    I, too, loved Abumrad’s interview! Short, sweet, but also insightful. As a non-English major, I didn’t even consider how this could relate to words on paper, but you are spot on! There is an intimate connection formed between the listener and the author (or producers in the radio case) and it is powerful. Great insight! #talkingpolack2015

    Reply
  4. Mitchell Eubank

    This is a short, but sweet, anecdote about how one voice can help, or hurt, anyone within earshot of it, and how the only ones who can control this power are the speakers themselves. I thoroughly enjoyed your argument, though it might be necessary to check your past entries for any errors between now and tomorrow night.
    #talkingpolack106

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *